Common Questions about New Jersey Estate Administration

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Becoming the Executor or personal representative of an estate is an important, yet often confusing, responsibility. Should a loved one or relative appoint you as Executor of their estate, you should contact an attorney. He/she can immediately alleviate much of the stress and confusion you experience as a result of your new obligation.

To further achieve that end, following are some common questions about NJ estate administration:

  • What is probate? — Probate is the legal process of validating a Will. To begin the probate process, go to the Surrogates Court with the original Will and the certificate of death. If the Will is not self-proven, one of the witnesses at the Will signing must validate the signature on the Will.
  • When do state inheritance taxes have to be paid? — In New Jersey, you must pay state inheritance taxes within eight months of the decedent’s death.
  • How can I retrieve a Will from a safety deposit box? — If you are the Executor of the Will, bring a copy of the Will with you that names you as the Executor. In some cases, a bank will allow the Executor to retrieve a Will with him or her present.
  • Do I have to serve as Executor of a will? — No, there is no law requiring you to serve as Executor of a Will. You may renounce your duty as Executor and the job will pass to the contingent executor if any exists. If there is no contingent executor, an Administrator will be appointed in accordance with the state’s intestacy laws.
  • How long does the probate process take? — The duration of the probate process depends on the complexity of the estate and the clarity and thoroughness of the Will. A vague Will may lead to a Will Contest, delaying the process further. Some large estates can take months or even years to settle.
  • What happens if there is no Will? — If no Will exists, an Administrator will be appointed to the estate and assets and property will be distributed based on New Jersey’s intestacy laws.

The job of an Executor can be daunting. Unless you have a background in law, you should not attempt the probate process alone. In the event you need help understanding estate administration in Hunterdon and Union Counties, contact Alec Borenstein, Esq., at alec@bmcestateplanning.com or call 908-236-6457.

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