N.J. Estate Tax versus Federal Estate Tax

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If you live in New Jersey and are planning your estate, you may be wondering how the N.J. and federal estate taxes will affect your heirs. Unfortunately, N.J. has both an inheritance tax and an estate tax. Furthermore, the state’s estate tax exemption limit is quite low when compared to the rest of the states in the union.

State exemption limit

The exemption limit in New Jersey as of 2016 is $675,000. If you are the executor of a Will, and the value of the gross estate is more than $675,000, you will have to file a New Jersey estate tax return. However, keep in mind that there are various deductions such as funeral expenses, attorney’s fees, and income tax bills that may reduce the estate value below the exemption limit.

Federal exemption limit

The federal exemption limit as of 2015 is $5.43 million per person, which is up from $5.34 million in 2014. This means that a married couple in 2016 can give away $10.86 million tax free. It also means, that unless the decedent’s gross estate is valued at more than $5.43 million, it won’t have to pay the federal estate tax rate of 40%.

What is meant by “the value of the gross estate”?

Many people make the mistake of assuming the word “estate” refers only to a house. In fact, it encompasses much more. In order to calculate the total value of a decedent’s estate, numerous assets are gathered and assessed, including:

  • New Jersey real estate;
  • Vehicles and other items of personal property;
  • Securities and investment accounts;
  • Funds from retirement account;
  • Business interests such as a sole proprietorship, limited liability company, or small corporation; and
  • Bank accounts and certificates of deposit.

Also keep in mind that any property you leave to your spouse or civil partner is exempt from the NJ estate tax.

Comprehending legal information after losing a loved one can be difficult and frustrating. An experienced attorney can explain estate planning to you in an easily accessible manner so that you and your family can move on with your lives. For more information on estate planning in Union and Hunterdon Counties, contact Alec Borenstein, Esq., at alec@bmcestateplanning.com or call 908-236-6457 today.

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