What happens to your debt after you die?

One question I get often from clients is, What happens to my debt after I die? Great question – but before we delve into the answers, I wanted to share with you three opportunities in June to attend a seminar I’m hosting with Round Table Wealth Management titled: Trump: Time to Update Your Investment & Estate Plan, But How? On June 7, I’ll be presenting in Scotch Plains, on June 8 in Red Bank, and on June 13 in Princeton. Please email me if you’d like to attend and I’ll send you an invitation! Our first seminar in Franklin Lakes was a great success!

 

Back to our regularly scheduled programming: Debt. While you ponder your mortality from time and time and think about the distribution of your assets, have you thought about what will happen to your outstanding debt?

In the past we have written about the need to appoint an executor you trust who will administer your estate in the most efficient way possible. One of the responsibilities of your executor is to take care of your outstanding debt. This is done by using the assets and property you leave behind to cover the balance. It some cases, this may require liquidation of property. Whatever is left over after your debts have been paid may then be distributed among your heirs.

Consider the following types of debt and what happens to it when you die:

  • Student loans — Federal loans are discharged upon death. Private loans, however, are not. In some rare cases, a private loan company may issue debt forgiveness, but it is unlikely. If you pass away with private student loan debt, the balance will attempt to be collected from your remaining assets and estate. Should your estate fail to cover the cost, the private loan company will then attempt to collect the debt from your spouse.
  • Credit card — If you are the sole owner of the credit card debt, then the credit card company will attempt to collect the balance from your estate. Should you have a joint credit card account, the co-signor of the account will be responsible for the outstanding debt.
  • Medical debt — In the event that you have medical debt, the funds from your estate will be used by your executor to cover the cost. Another person may take on the responsibility of your medical debt if they signed legal documents agreeing to do so. In the event that your estate is unable to pay off your medical debt, it will not be inherited by your heirs.

When drafting your estate plan, it is always a good idea to try and reduce the debt you owe by as much as possible, especially if you want to leave substantial property or assets to your loved ones. Any debt you accrue while you’re alive may deprive your family of the inheritance you intended for them to enjoy.

Whether you need help setting up a trust, probating a will or creating a detailed estate plan, be sure to consult with a skilled attorney. To discuss your estate planning matter with us, contact Alec Borenstein, Esq., a partner with the firm at alec@bmcestateplanning.com or call 908-236-6457 today.

The Documents You Need for Your Estate Plan

The Documents You Need for Your Estate Plan

Whether you are thinking about creating an estate plan or already have one in place, it is important to ensure you have the proper documentation. Unless you have a law degree, understanding estate planning can be confusing.

In this DIY age, you may be inclined to try and create your estate plan on your own via the internet. Don’t. In fact, without an effective estate plan and proper documentation, your future heirs may suffer and your last wishes may not be upheld.

Following are the documents you need to ensure your legacy is preserved:

1. A will — For many people, this is the be all/end all of estate planning – the holiest of holy documents and the only one seen as worth having. A will is indeed vital to your estate plan as it provides instructions on how your property and assets should be disposed of and who your beneficiaries should be. In your will, you may describe how you wish to be buried, what charities you wish to donate to, who should care for your pets, and more. Additionally, your will allows you to name an executor to handle the administration of your estate after your death. Without this document, your estate is subject to New Jersey’s intestacy laws.

2. A health care proxy — A health care proxy is a document that names a trusted individual to make decisions about your health should you become unconscious or mentally disabled. No one wants to imagine what might happen to their loved ones if they should fall into a vegetative state or suffer from a terrible illness like dementia. Yet considering such possibilities and setting up a health care proxy is important to ensure your family knows your wishes should something happen to you.

3. Durable Power of attorney — Unfortunately, many estate planners stop at their will. While your will is extremely important to your estate plan, the buck doesn’t stop there. What if you should become incapacitated via accident, injury or illness? Who will handle decisions about your healthcare and finances? With a durable power of attorney, you name a trusted person who takes care of things like paying your bills, making medical decisions or handling your investments.

No two estate plans are the same. Your estate plan reflects your life, your estate, your assets and the legacy you wish to leave behind. Depending on your unique situation, your plan may be more or less complicated.

For more information about estate planning in Union or Hunterdon County, consult with Alec Borenstein, Esq., a partner with the firm at alec@bmcestateplanning.com or call 908-236-6457 today.

Improper Estate Planning Reveals the Secret KFC Recipe!

Happy New Year! In the culinary world, a secret recipe is everything. For fast food giant KFC, the recipe for its chicken is so closely guarded that it sits in a 770-pound safe covered in two feet of concrete and monitored by motion sensors and video cameras. Seriously, it sounds like something out of a Mission Impossible movie!

Yet recently, as covered in a New York Times article, the company’s lip-smacking spice blend may have been revealed to the world via the last will and testament of Colonel Sanders’ second wife. It all started this past August when Jay Jones, a reporter for The Chicago Tribune, traveled to Corbin, Kentucky to write a piece about the town where the famous Colonel first made his fried chicken.

Mr. Jones set up a meeting with Colonel Sanders’ nephew, Joe Ledington. At some point during the meeting, Mr. Ledington pulled out an old scrapbook that contained pictures and family memoirs. Allegedly, the scrapbook was the property of Claudia Ledington, Colonel Harland Sanders’ second wife who passed away in 1996. Tucked away in the back of the scrap book was Claudia’s last will and testament. In the last pages of the will was a handwritten recipe for a spice rub. Mr. Ledington claimed that the 11 spices and herbs listed in the last will were in fact the secret recipe locked up tight in a safe weighing nearly 800 pounds.

Yum Foods, the parent company that owns KFC, claims the recipe isn’t accurate. The exact spice blend from Claudia Ledington’s last will and testament is as follows and should be mixed with 2 cups of flower:

2/3 tablespoon salt
1/2 tablespoon thyme
1/2 tablespoon basil
1/3 tablespoon oregano
1 tablespoon celery salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon dried mustard
4 tablespoons paprika
2 tablespoons garlic salt
1 tablespoon ground ginger
3 tablespoons white pepper

Now, from an estate planning perspective, a couple of things can be learned. First, you can bequeath amazing recipes to your descendants. However, if you have a recipe that may be responsible for hundreds of franchise restaurants and billions of dollars in revenue, you may want to update your estate plan. In 1996 when Claudia Ledington passed away, KFC was already a successful brand and household name. Instead of leaving the original spice rub on a hand-written note in the back of a scrap book, she may have wanted to rewrite and seal the document in a safe or safety deposit box.

Second, if you do have a secret recipe to leave in your safety deposit box, it’s never a good idea to leave your last will and testament in your safety deposit box. It’s like leaving the key to the deposit box in your deposit box.

Whether you need help leaving Grandma’s famous apple pie recipe to your children or establishing a trust, it is in your best interests to contact an experienced estate planning lawyer. If you have any questions, please call us at (908) 236-6457, or email me at alec@bmcestateplanning.com.

Estate Plan Checklist

power of a will, wills, trusts, estate planning, union and hunterdon counties new jersey

After weeks, months, or maybe even years of procrastinating, you’re finally ready to set up your estate plan. Remember, the sooner you create your estate plan, the sooner you will have peace of mind that your family is taken care of should something happen to you.

Many people who decide to create an estate plan say, I just want a simple plan, nothing fancy. The truth of the matter is that your estate, assets and family members greatly determine the complexity of your estate plan. So while you may want a simple plan that requires very little of your time to set up, the circumstances of your estate and life may dictate otherwise.

Of course you can always make your life easier by running through the following estate plan checklist:

  1. Determine the goal of your estate plan — So, you’ve decided you need an estate plan. Why? What is the ultimate goal of having an estate plan in place? Are you a philanthropist who wants to see your wealth enjoyed by the less fortunate? Maybe you want to leave everything you have to your spouse. Or perhaps your intention is to preserve your legacy for many generations after you’re gone.
  2. Retain an estate planning lawyer — Unless you practice law, you probably don’t know much about estate planning, wills, trusts, healthcare directives and other estate planning mechanisms. When hiring a lawyer, make sure you choose someone who practices estate planning law in your state. And no, don’t attempt to move forward on your own without an estate planning lawyer — this is your legacy after all.
  3. Identify your assets — Prior to setting up an estate plan, you need to be able to identify all assets and property you own. Depending on your financial situation, compiling such a list may require more than a Sunday afternoon.
  4. Identify your executor — If you had to choose one person in your life to handle all your affairs after your death, who would it be? The person you name as your executor must be a trustworthy and competent individual who will ensure the wishes of your last will and testament are carried out.

Now that you’ve successfully gone through this checklist, it’s time to draft your estate plan. To begin the process, make an appointment with your estate planning lawyer as soon as possible. For more information on estate planning in NJ and NY, Contact Alec Borenstein, Esq., at alec@bmcestateplanning.com, or call 908-236-6457.

What to Leave Out When Making Your Will

What-to-leave-out-when-making-your-will-Hunterdon-County-New-Jersey-Union-County-New-Jersey

So you’ve finally decided to sit down and draft your Will. While you should be applauded for your effort, what you may not realize is what you leave out of your Will can be just as important as what you include.

Having a sound Will in place is important because it tells your surviving loved ones how your property and assets should be disposed of after you’re gone. Without a Will in place, your estate falls under New Jersey’s intestacy laws. Many people assume that by creating a Will, they can distribute their property and assets with impunity. However, depending on your situation, you may have certain assets or properties that are already bequeathed to another beneficiary.

One common example is joint tenancy property. Let’s say you and your brother own a piece of property together. When drafting your Will, however, you request that your ownership pass to your spouse. Upon your death, by law, your interest in the joint tenancy property would pass to your brother and not your spouse despite your Will requesting otherwise.

Another similar example is life insurance. If you already have a beneficiary to your life insurance policy, stating in your Will that you would like another person to be your beneficiary is a futile effort. According to the law, you already named a beneficiary — your Will cannot invalidate your policy and designate a new beneficiary.

Avoid leaving gifts for unlawful purposes

When leaving a gift in your Will, do not include unlawful instructions regarding how the gift should be used. For example, you would be unable to leave your Malibu home to your nephew under the condition that the home only be used for trafficking drugs.

Leave funeral instructions out of your Will

If you have detailed instructions about how you wish to buried, you aren’t alone. However, you should resist the urge to include funeral instructions in your Will. Why? Because most estates and probate proceedings aren’t dealt with until after the funeral, making your extensive and well-thought out funerary guidelines of little use to your heirs. Instead, simply talk to your loved ones about how you wish to be buried.

For more information about what you should and should not include in your will, consult with an experienced estate planning attorney today. Contact Alec Borenstein, Esq., at alec@bmcestateplanning.com, or call 908-236-6457 for assistance with estate planning matters in New Jersey and New York.

By at .

1 2 3 12